Trails
Your search for all items in the catergory trails
Pages <   1   2   3   4   5   6   >
 logo
Trail: 
Description: 
 logo
Trail: 
Description: 
 logo
Trail: 
Description: The City of Bath traces its history back to Roman times when the Romans came to take advantage of and to worship at its hot springs.
 logo
Trail: 
Description: Stroud's main claim to note has been as a woolen and worsted producing town in the west of England.
 logo
Trail: 
Description: This Trail has been kindly provided by Leo Baeck College and the Reform Synagogues of Great Britain, and is a tour of the Hoop Lane Reform Cemetery in their new booklet, "A History in our Time - Rabbis and Teachers Buried at Hoop Lane Cemetery".
 logo
Trail: Alderney Holocaust and Slave Labour Trail
Description: When the Nazis first occupied Alderney with a small force, it could not have been anticipated at the time that the island would effectively become one giant slave labour camp with many thousands of captives culled from countries across three continents, nor that the island would be host to the western-most SS concentration camp in Europe, Camp Sylt. Furthermore, the island witnessed great human suffering and death, on a large scale (as perhaps as many as 50 - 85% of all the prisoners died on, or off, the island), with the island also becoming a staging post of the Holocaust. Many hundreds of Jewish captives were on the islands working and suffering in the most abject conditions of all. Some died on the island and many were then sent on to other camps, or for extermination in Auschwitz.
 logo
Trail: Bedford
Description: The Bedford Jewry was a small but fascinating Jewry, with an active medieval Jewish community, who took part in the turbulent history of the times, including resisting the King in the siege of Bedford castle. The modern community was founded in the 18th century, and in the 19th century; the Rabbi of Bedford Synagogue caused scandal by converting to Christianity. Later, in the century, Morris Lissack, fought a successful one-man battle for Jewish education and emancipation in Bedford. At the turn of the 20th century the remarkable Abrahams family took up residence in Bedford and produced two Jewish Olympic athletes, including Harold Abrahams, who Olympic feats were celebrated in the film 'Chariots of Fire'.
 logo
Trail: Brackley
Description: Brackley is a very small market town, in rural Northamptonshire, on the main road between Northampton and Oxford. Until after the War, the town was little larger than a large village, with a market place and 2 - 3,000 residents. However, the town has an unexpected and little known Jewish heritage, largely dating from just after World War I, to the end of World War II. It illustrates the unexpected links that Jewish people could often have in deeply rural areas and it is also a particularly good example of the ranges of Jewish war-time experiences as refugees and evacuees in the countryside.
 logo
Trail: Brighton and Hove
Description: We are proud to announce the completion of our Brighton and Hove Trail, with the help of the Brighton and Hove community. This trail illustrates the fascinating and extensive Jewish Heritage of Brighton and Hove and demonstrates that it is among the most important Jewish heritage locations in the country. The trail falls into two linked trails - the Brighton Trail and the West Brighton and Hove Trail.
 logo
Trail: Bury St. Edmunds
Description: A centre of Jewish learning, the community came a cropper when it meddled in medieval politics and was subsequently subjected to a blood libel and brutal massacre in which 57 of its members were killed.
 logo
Trail: Camp Tibor Holocaust Trail, France
Description: In World War II a group of 2252 Jewish men, living in Belgium (some were born in Belgium but many from all across Europe) were stripped of their civil rights by the Germans, then thrown out of work and labelled as 'anti-social elements', and because they were un-employed forcibly separated from this families and deported to work as slave labour on Hitler's Atlantic Wall, in the vicinity of Boulogne and Calais, in July to August 1942. They were sent to some 15 permanent and temporary forced labour camps, mostly along the coast and they were later joined by 650 French Jews who had been deported from camps on the Island of Alderney in the Channel Islands. The Jew from Belgium worked on the Atlantic Wall for three months making bunkers and defences, as well as repairing bomb damage, for Organisation Todt (OT), Hitler's 'super' civil contractor. The camp at Dannes continued to operate throughout the War as the central slave labour camp in the area and administered a network of camps along the line of the coast. The original Jewish cohort was joined and partly replaced by, 'Red' Spaniard and Russian men and boys. At the end of the War it became a German POW camp.
 logo
Trail: Dover
Description: The origins of the Dover Jewish community are surrounded in some mystery. The community may have begun in the medieval period, though the evidence is incomplete.
 logo
Trail: Guildford
Description: Are the ghostly goings-on in the cellar of a shop on the High Street, the spirits of members of the medieval Jewish community coming to pray in the ruins of Guildford's 12th century sunken synagogue?
 logo
Trail: Historical Walking Tour of Jewish Hull
Description: The history of Hull as a Jewish centre and transmigration port for Jews is a very important and intersting one. This tour of Jewish Hull has been researched and written by the Hull Jewish Archive Committee over the last two years and was launched as an attractive guide and map. We are very pleased that the Committee has kindly agreed to additionally place their trail on the JTrails web-site for personal enjoyment and research. The trail is copy-right June 2008) to the HJAC and further inquiries can be made to Hull Jewish Archive Committee, 30 Pryme Street, Anlaby HU10 6SH
 logo
Trail: Leeds
Description: The eminent historian of Leeds Jewish history, Murray Freedman has written a history and trail of Jewish Leeds, and details its history from small beginnings in the early 19th century, to its height as one of the leading Anglo-Jewish communities. While Leeds has declined from its pre-War importance, it is still a leading Jewish center in England out-side of London and Manchester.
 logo
Trail: Lincoln
Description: Lincoln was, in the Middle Ages, one of the most important of the English Jewish communities.
 logo
Trail: Lincoln Cathedral Jewish Heritage
Description: 

Lincoln Cathedral is famed for its great Christian heritage but its unique Jewish heritage and links to the famous medieval Jewish community in Lincoln, is still largely unknown.

This Jewish community of Lincoln was one of the most important in England in its time and the names of some of its leading personalities are still celebrated, including the famous scholar Rabbi Berechiah of Lincoln, and Aaron of Lincoln, who helped make the fortune of the Cistercian monasteries in the north and even loaned the money needed to build the Bishop's Palace.
This community made a vivid impression on the very fabric of Lincoln Cathedral, which is rich in Jewish associations and influences, shown in its art, architecture, artefacts and hidden symbolism of the Cathedral. Parts of the decorative design of the Cathedral may have direct Jewish influences, while the remains of the Shrine of Little Hugh are still one of the most controversial relics of medieval anti-Semitism in England.
This Trail was Featured in Simon Schama's, 'The Story of the Jews' documentary'


 logo
Trail: London Top 10 Jewish Visits
Description: This Trail introduces the Top 10 Jewish visits and activities in London - some very well-known and others less well-known, but all can be the inspiration for a Jewish heritage visit or stay in London! This trail of activities and visits was created by one of London's top Jewish heritage guides, Rachel Kolsky of Go-London and author of 'Jewish London'.
 logo
Trail: Nord Pas de Calais Camps Trail of Memory
Description: 

This innovative heritage trail explores Nazi slavery in the Pas de Calais in World War II and the 'Holocaust in Sight of England'. It creates a new European 'Trail of Memory' along the 'front-line' of Nazi slavery in Western Europe in memory of the victims of Nazi slavery. The trail included the 19+ Jewish slave labour camps along the coast created for Jews from across Europe as part of a system of 2300 slave labour camps specifically for Jews and some of the surviving sites of labour and memory associated with their feats of 'super-human labour'. The enslavement of many other groups and nations in the area is part of the trail of memory as well, as many Russians (including children as young as 12) were brought to the area, though at least 27 nations were enslaved in the Pas de Calais and in the Channel Islands, often employed in constructing the giant V-Weapon block houses further inland.

The former Jewish camp at Sangatte reminds us that the current 'camp' at Sangatte is not the first and that there is a long history of conflict in the region and that the great international forces of each era pushing marginalized and dispossessed peoples to the fringe of Europe. This trail has a message relevant to the present and future as slavery is still common across the world and takes many forms.

Click here to download the trail route


 logo
Trail: Northampton
Description: One of the leading medieval communities in England, Northampton's Jews were given the boot in 1290. However, seven centuries later they would return to give the boot to Northampton.
 logo
Trail: Oxford
Description: Home to some of the most celebrated scholars and academics of all time, since the days of the Domesday Book, Jews have made a vital contribution to both Oxford the university and Oxford the town.
 logo
Trail: Ramsgate
Description: The story of Ramsgate Jewish community is beyond doubt dominated by the life and memory of one man - a towering figure of Anglo-Jewry. This was Moses Montefiori. While Montefiori did much to place Ramsgate on the Jewish map, and built a synagogue and a college, the Ramsgate Jewish community was already established, before Sir Moses' arrival, and included other interesting and important individuals, such as Benjamin Norden, a notable early explorer of southern Africa, and an exotic contingent of North African Jews, as well as important Jewish educators and scholars. This trail was the first ever Jewish heritage trail of Ramsgate, originally created in 2004.
 logo
Trail: Ramsgate
Description: The Montefiori family

The story of Ramsgate Jewish community is beyond doubt dominated by the life and memory of one man - a towering figure of Anglo-Jewry. This was Moses Montefiori.

 logo
Trail: Sheerness and Blue Town
Description: The Jewish heritage and history of Sheerness and Blue Town is fascinating and virtually unknown in this still remote part of England. The Jewish community in Blue Town grew up alongside the Naval Dock Yard during the Napoleonic Wars and echos of this past can still be detected in the western part of Blue Town next to the old Dock Wall.
 logo
Trail: Stroud
Description: Stroud's main claim to note has been as a woolen and worsted producing town in the west of England. The town lies quite dramatically on the steep flanks of a valley and is surprisingly remindful of one of the old woolen towns in the north of England.
 logo
Trail: THE BRADFORD JEWISH HERITAGE TRAIL
Description: Bradford has a proud history. It was the wool capital of the world (a trade which originated in Yorkshire in the 14th century, based on the Cistercians and their superior woolly sheep), and part of the cradle of the Industrial revolution - a city full of 'Yorkshire grit'. These are some of the titles that apply to Bradford. However, at first glance the Jewish connection to Bradford seems a strange one.
 logo
Trail: The City of Bath
Description: The City of Bath traces its history back to Roman times, when the Romans came to take advantage of and to worship at its hot springs. While the medieval inhabitants of Bath made some use of its springs, the main medieval trade was in cloth. The city was to come into pre-eminence - a veritable renaissance - when the continental spa craze swept the country, and the waters of the town became foremost in Britain in the 18th century.
 logo
Trail: The City of London
Description: 

London has always been the center of Jewish life in this country and is the oldest place of Jewish settlement in England.

The Jews of England arrived first of all in London in the wake of William of Normandy's conquest of England. It is thought they arrived shortly afterwards, though the first documented reference to a Jewish quarter in London, only comes in c.1127, when they had arguably been there for some 50 years or more. Initially they were probably only a small group, only reinforced in numbers with Jews fleeing from the Rouen pogrom in 1096.


 logo
Trail: The Jew's Road (Chemin des Juifs)
Description: This trail focuses on the experiences of David Shentow, one of the only survivors of the Belgian Jewish slave labourers, and his story of forced labour in constructing a 4km concrete road the 'Chemin des Juifs' (the 'Jews Road') close to Hardelot and Condette and his experiences at one of the main Jewish concentration camps, Lager Tibor, at Dannes. This is one of several trails exploring the little known story of the Holocaust and slave labour along the coast in Nord Pas de Calais not far from Boulogne and shows that the reach of Hitler's slave archipelago reached within sight of England. The start of the trail is 8.5 km south of Boulogne and can be found by proceeding to the village of Condette, taking the signs to Ch√Ęteau d'Hardelot (geo-location = 50.647020, 1.612536) and then walking down the Rue de la Source, to the start point of the Jews Road, off the road to the right. (geo-location = 50.646147, 1.608720)
 logo
Trail: Touring Jewish Canterbury
Description: 

A visit to Canterbury is always well worth the effort and worth a special visit. The city is of exceptional interest, with its rich history, and buildings of national importance - its Cathedral and the ruins of St Augustine's Priory, the Castle and city walls, and a large number of surviving medieval and post medieval buildings in the city centre.

Added to this there is a rich Jewish history to be discovered in Canterbury both from the medieval and modern period. The sites of the medieval Jews are readily traceable and there are strong historical associations with more modern buildings such as the County Hotel


 logo
Trail: Touring Jewish Gloucester
Description: Gloucester has an unexpected and fascinating Jewish history linked to the military and port history of the city. There have been two distinctive organised Jewish communities in Gloucester - one established in the 12th century and ended by the time of the general Expulsion of the Jews in 1290, and a second community, established perhaps even as early as 1685. This, if correct, makes it one of the first provincial Jewish settlements out-side of London, after the resettlement of the Jews in England in 1655. There is also a modern Jewish population in modern-day Gloucester, but no organised community life, or synagogue, as most Jews, with a religious affiliation, are members of the nearby Cheltenham Synagogue.
  Pages <   1   2   3   4   5   6   >
oxford heritage trail logo the spiro ark logo